Đề Xuất 1/2023 # What Is The Difference Between A “Request” And An “Inquiry”? # Top 8 Like | Cuocthitainang2010.com

Đề Xuất 1/2023 # What Is The Difference Between A “Request” And An “Inquiry”? # Top 8 Like

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As a noun, the word “inquiry” is commonly defined as an act by which information is sought. In this instance, it is used in the form of a question or a query.  Furthermore, the word can also refer to a formal or official investigation. Synonyms in this regard would be…

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As a noun, the word “inquiry” is commonly defined as an act by which information is sought. In this instance, it is used in the form of a question or a query.  Furthermore, the word can also refer to a formal or official investigation. Synonyms in this regard would be investigation, examination, probe, review, exploration, analysis, review, hearing, and inquest.

As a verb, the appropriate form is “inquire” and it has the same meanings as defined above. 

A request (in its noun form) is defined as an act in which one asks for something to be done or given, mostly as a favor, solicitation, or petition. Synonyms in this regard would be plea, petition, application, call, demand, appeal, and entreaty.

If used as a verb, it means to politely or formally ask for something.

The difference between the two words should be clear from the above definitions. To further clarify the contrast, one may look at the context in which each word is used, as in the following examples:

Inquiry:

The committee lodged an inquiry in which it sought more information on what it believed was excessive expenditure.

Upon my inquiry about her whereabouts, she explained that she had been to the grocer.

A medical inquiry has a very formalized structure.

At his inquiry, Peter informed them that he lived in Aberdeen and that he had been unemployed. 

I instituted an inquiry to determine the facts of the matter.

You should inquire why the task was not completed.

I inquired why such a large batch of documents had to be completed.

Request:

The teacher’s request for more funding was turned down by the board.

I rolled down the car window at my passenger’s request.

The agreement was signed after the president’s request that they come to some kind of accord.

The student was told that he should request permission to leave the classroom.

“I hope I have fulfilled your request for greater care,” said Norman.

The community lodged a request with the council for greater protection.

What’S The Difference Between Which And Where?

What’s the difference between which and where?

such like these examples:

The building which I visited was 350 m tall.

The restaurant where my cousin works is really expensive.

My friend is taking me to a shopping centre which is huge.

This hotel where we spent our summer holiday last year.

The relative pronouns “which” and “where” specifically describe a place. “Where” is followed by a noun or pronoun.

That’s a great question as many students are confused by the way they are used in some sentences. The difference, however, is not too difficult to understand.

Which, is a pronoun and determiner.

Let’s use your sentences to answer the question and provide more details.

This sentence correctly applies the determiner “which,” to provide further information the building had already been mentioned earlier in the sentence.

Which, can be used both before and after as a pronoun and determiner. Here are some further examples.

coffee would you like, the cappuccino or expresso?

The cappuccino has milk, but the expresso doesn’t, one do you want?

A cappuccino is not as strong as an expresso has no milk.

The in this sentence is to not referring to the place but the situation of the cousin, because it was used after the place had already been mentioned. To prove this point, if we removed this part of the clause, the sentence still makes sense – The restaurant is really expensive.

However, if we reword the sentence and use which as a determiner, the focus of the sentence returns to the place/restaurant as we are also using ‘at’ as a preposition of place.

My friend is taking me to a shopping center which is huge.

Again in this sentence is used as a determiner to provide further information about the shopping center mentioned beforehand. It helps us understand that is is the shopping center which is huge and not the friend! (That could be embarrassing!)

This hotel where we spent our summer holiday last year.

Technically this sentence should read, ‘this IS THE hotel where we spent our summer last year.’ Again the use of in this sentence is to the situation, not the hotel, as it comes after the place has already been mentioned. To prove the point we could eliminate the word entirely and use the preposition ‘at’ instead.

This is the hotel we spent our summer last year.

To use for the place itself, place the word before the noun.

We can meet where the hotel is, the one that we spent summer at last year.

Just remember, which and where are not interchangeable alone, if swapped other parts of the sentence would need to be corrected as well. When changed they can modify the focus or meaning of the clause.

Put simply.

If you are focusing on a situation or place use .

If you are making a distinction between two or more things, then use .

What’S The Difference Between A Uri And A Url?

The terms “URI” and “URL” are often used interchangeably, but they are not exactly the same.

A URI is an identifier of a specific resource. Like a page, or book, or a document.

A URL is special type of identifier that also tells you how to access it, such as HTTPs, FTP, etc.-like https://www.google.com.

If the protocol (https, ftp, etc.) is either present or implied for a domain, you should call it a URL -even though it’s also a URI.

All URLs are URIs, but not all URIs are URLs.

When most people talk about a given URI, they’re also talking about a URL because the protocol is implied.

That’s really it.

TL;DR – When communicating, being more specific is usually better, and a “URL” is a specific type of URI that provides an access method/location.

That’s all you probably need to know, but if you want to see how the sausage is made (I warn you, it’s gross), feel free to read on!

A deeper explanation (let’s get technical)

This is one of the most common Nerd Fight debates in tech history, and that’s saying a lot.

One obstacle to getting to the bottom of things is that the relevant RFCs are extremely dense, confusing, and even contradictory. For example, RFC 3986 says a URI can be a name, locator, or both…

My emphasis.

A URI can be further classified as a locator, a name, or both. The term “Uniform Resource Locator” (URL) refers to the subset of URIs that, in addition to identifying a resource, provide a means of locating the resource by describing its primary access mechanism (e.g., its network “location”).

RFC 3986, Section 1.1.3

But just a little further down that same RFC says…

My emphasis.

The URI itself only provides identification; access to the resource is neither guaranteed nor implied by the presence of a URI.

RFC 3986, Section 1.2.2

And then, if you’re not yet completely confused, it also says…

My emphasis.

Each URI begins with a scheme name, as defined in Section 3.1, that refers to a specification for assigning identifiers within that scheme.

RFC 3986, Section 1.1.1

And it goes on to give examples:

Notice how they all their examples have schemes.

ftp://ftp.is.co.za/rfc/rfc1808.txt http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt ldap://[2001:db8::7]/c=GB?objectClass?one mailto:John.Doe@example.com news:comp.infosystems.www.servers.unix tel:+1-816-555-1212 telnet://192.0.2.16:80/ urn:oasis:names:specification:docbook:dtd:xml:4.1.2

Wait…what?

These three contradictions are the source of this entire long-lived debate.

The same RFC just told us that a URI can be a name, a locator, or both-but a URI only provides identification, and a way to access isn’t guaranteed or implied-oh and also each URI begins with a scheme name (which in many cases tells you exactly how to access the resource).

It’s no wonder everyone is confused!

The reason the internet’s been fighting about this for over a decade is that the RFC is poorly written.

Salvaging practical rules from all this

Being the top search result for this topic means I have the conversation a lot.

Ok, so given the fact that the RFC adds to confusion rather than eliminating it, what-if anything-can we use from them?

In the vein of language being here for communication rather than pedantry, here are my own practical interpretations of the RFCs that will hopefully synchronize people and result in fewer swordfights.

All butterflies fly, but not everything that flies is a butterfly.

A Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) provides a simple and extensible means for identifying a resource (straight from RFC 3986). It’s just an identifier; don’t overthink it.

For most debates about this that matter, URI is the superset, so the question is just whether a given URI is formally a URL or not. All URLs are URIs, but not all URIs are URLs. In general, if you see http(s)://, it’s a URL.

Fragments like file.htm actually are not URNs, because URNs are required to use a special notation with urn: in the beginning.

A little-known section of RFC 3986 actually speaks directly to the religious part of the argument, and seems to say we should say URI instead of URL.

RFC 3986 is from 2005, so presumably they’re saying URI is the preferred term after that point.

Future specifications and related documentation should use the general term “URI” rather than the more restrictive terms “URL” and “URN”

RFC 3986, Section 1.1.3

So that’s support for the “URI” denomination, but in my opinion it’s even more support for those who say, “stop looking for the answers in 15-year-old RFCs”.

It’s like another widely-read text in this way.

There’s just so much contradictory content that there’s partial backing for multiple conclusions.

Summary

What a mess. Here’s the TL;DR…

The RFCs are ancient, poorly written, and not worth debating until they’re updated.

A URI is an identifier.

A URL is an identifier that tells you how to get to it.

Use the term that is best understood by the recipient.

I’d welcome a new version of the RFC that simplifies and clarifies the distinction, with modern examples.

These RFCs were written a very long time ago, and they’re written with the academic weakness of not being optimized for reading.

The best thing I can possibly tell you about this debate is not to over-index on it. I’ve not once in 20 years seen a situation where the confusion between URI or URL actually mattered.

The irony is that RFCs are supposed to remove confusion, not add to it.

So while there is some direct support that “URI” is preferred by the RFCs, and “URL” seems most accurate for full addresses with http(s) schemes (because it’s most specific), I’ve chosen to prioritize the Principle of Communication Clarity higher than that of pedantic nuance.

It’s taken me a long time to get to this point.

As a result, I personally use “URL” in most cases because it’s least likely to cause confusion, but if I hear someone use “URI” I’ll often switch immediately to using that instead.

Notes

May 3, 2019 – I’ve done a major update to the article, including correcting some errors I had had in previous versions. Namely, I had fragments such as file.html shown as a URN, which is not right. This version of the article is the best version, especially since it fully explores the conflicting language within the RFC and how little we should actually be paying attention to such an old document. I’d definitely read and follow an update, though.

RFC 3986 Link

The Wikipedia article on URI Link

What Is The Difference Between Depart And Leave?

As verbs the difference between depart and leave

is that depart is to leave; to set out on a journey while leave is to cause or allow (something) to remain as available; to refrain from taking (something) away; to stop short of consuming or otherwise depleting (something) entirely or leave can be to give leave to; allow; permit; let; grant or leave can be (rare) to produce leaves or foliageoxford english dictionary , 2nd ed.

As nouns the difference between depart and leave

is that depart is (obsolete) division; separation, as of compound substances while leave is (cricket) the action of the batsman not attempting to play at the ball or leave can be permission to be absent; time away from one’s work.

Other Comparisons: What’s the difference?

Verb

()

To leave.

*Shakespeare

*:He which hath no stomach to this fight, / Let him depart .

*2009 , George Monbiot, The Guardian , 7 September:

*:The government maintains that if its regulations are too stiff, British bankers will leave the country. It’s true that they have been threatening to depart in droves, but the obvious answer is: “Sod off then.”

To set out on a journey.

*:

*:And soo she receyued hym vpon suffysaunt seurte / so alle her hurtes were wel restored of al that she coude complayne / and thenne he departed vnto the Courte of kyne Arthur / and there openly the reed knyghte of the reed laundes putte hym in the mercy of syre Launcelot and syr Gawayne

To die.

*Bible, Luke ii. 29:

*:Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace.

To deviate (from).

:His latest statements seemed to depart from party policy somewhat.

:to depart from a title or defence in legal pleading

*Madison

*:if the plan of the convention be found to depart from republican principles

To go away from; to leave.

*Bible, 1 Sam. iv. 2:

*:The glory is departed from Israel.

*2009 , The Guardian , Sport Blog, 9 September:

*:The build-up to Saturday’s visit of Macedonia and this encounter with the Dutch could be construed as odd in the sense that there seemed a basic acceptance, inevitability even, that Burley would depart office in their immediate aftermath.

(obsolete) To divide up; to distribute, share.

*:

*:and so all the worlde seythe that betwyxte three knyghtes is departed clerely knyghthode, that is Sir Launcelot du Lake, Sir Trystrams de Lyones and Sir Lamerok de Galys-thes bere now the renowne.

(obsolete) To separate, part.

*:

:(Shakespeare)

Synonyms

* ( to leave) duck out, go, go away, leave, part, pull up stakes, start, start out, set forth, split, set off, set out, take off, take leave, quit * ( to die) die * ( to deviate) deviate, digress, diverge, sidetrack, straggle, vary * ( to go away from) leave

Antonyms

* ( to leave): arrive, come, stay * ( to die): live * ( to deviate): conform

Noun

(obsolete) division; separation, as of compound substances

* Francis Bacon

(obsolete) A going away; departure.

* Shakespeare

Etymology 1

From ( etyl) leven, from ( etyl) (whence Danish levne). More at .

Verb

To have a consequence or remnant.

#To cause or allow (something) to remain as available; to refrain from taking (something) away; to stop short of consuming or otherwise depleting (something) entirely.

#:

#*, chapter=7

, title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=[…] St.?Bede’s at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger’s mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.}}

#*{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan

, title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=( American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.

#To cause, to result in.

#:

#*{{quote-book, year=1899, author=(Stephen Crane)

, title=, chapter=1 , passage=There was some laughter, and Roddle was left free to expand his ideas on the periodic visits of cowboys to the town. “Mason Rickets, he had ten big punkins a-sittin’ in front of his store, an’ them fellers from the Upside-down-F ranch shot ’em up

#*, chapter=23

, title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.}}

#*{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)

, title= Out of the gloom , passage=[Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.}}

#(lb) To put; to place; to deposit; to deliver, with a sense of withdrawing oneself.

#:

#*Bible, (w) v. 24

#*:Leave there thy gift before the altar and go thy way.

#*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)

#*:The foot / That leaves the print of blood where’er it walks.

(lb) To depart; to separate from.

#To let be or do without interference.

#:

#(lb) To depart from; to end one’s connection or affiliation with.

#:

#*

, title=( The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=I was about to say that I had known the Celebrity from the time he wore kilts. But I see I will have to amend that, because he was not a celebrity then, nor, indeed, did he achieve fame until some time after I left New York for the West.}}

#(lb) To end one’s membership in (a group); to terminate one’s affiliation with (an organization); to stop participating in (a project).

#:

#(lb) To depart; to go away from a certain place or state.

#:

(lb) To transfer something.

#(lb) To transfer possession of after death.

#:

#(lb) To give (something) to someone; to deliver (something) to a repository; to deposit.

#:

#(lb) To transfer responsibility or attention of (something) (to someone); to stop being concerned with.

#:

To remain (behind); to stay.

*:

*:And whanne sire launcelot sawe them fare soo / he gat a spere in his hand / and there encountred with hym al attones syr bors sir Ector and sire Lyonel / and alle they thre smote hym atte ones with their speres

*

*:Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers,. Even such a boat as the Mount Vernon offered a total deck space so cramped as to leave secrecy or privacy well out of the question, even had the motley and democratic assemblage of passengers been disposed to accord either.

To stop, desist from; to “leave off” (+ noun / gerund).

*:When he had leeft speakynge, he sayde vnto Simon: Cary vs into the depe, and lett slippe thy nette to make a draught.

*(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)

*:Now leave complaining and begin your tea.

Derived terms

* beleave * forleave * leave behind * leave for dead * leave no stone unturned * leave nothing in the tank * leave someone hanging * leave someone high and dry * leave someone holding the bag * leave off * leave out * leave in the lurch * leave well enough alone * not leave one’s thought * overleave * up and leave

Noun

()

(cricket) The action of the batsman not attempting to play at the ball.

(billiards) The arrangement of balls in play that remains after a shot is made (which determines whether the next shooter – who may be either the same player, or an opponent – has good options, or only poor ones).

* 1890 February 27, “Slosson’s Close Shave”], in [[w:New York Times, The New York Times] :

Etymology 2

From ( etyl) leve, from ( etyl) . Related to ( etyl) verlof, ( etyl) Erlaubnis. See also ( l).

Noun

(–)

Permission to be absent; time away from one’s work.

I’ve been given three weeks’ leave by my boss.

(senseid)(dated, or, legal) Permission.

The applicant now seeks leave to appeal and, if leave be granted, to appeal against these sentences.

(dated) Farewell, departure.

I took my leave of the gentleman without a backward glance.

Derived terms

* administrative leave * annual leave * by your leave * compassionate leave * leave of absence * maternity leave * on leave * parental leave * paternity leave * shore leave * sick leave * take French leave * take leave * ticket-of-leave

Verb

To give leave to; allow; permit; let; grant.

Verb

(rare) To produce leaves or foliage.Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd ed.

* 1868 , , The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám , 2nd edition:

Each Morn a thousand Roses brings, you say:

What Is The Difference Between Shipping And Delivery?

What Is Shipping?

There are two main definitions of shipping when it comes to logistics. The first definition speaks to the size of the package. Smaller objects, such as shoes, clothes, and accessories, can fall under the category of shipping since they can be boxed and sent to the customer using a postal service. The second definition refers to when items are required to be sent to customers. As such, consumers can understand the shipping date to be the day on which the item was dispatched and began making its way to them.

What Is Delivery?

Delivery often refers to larger objects, like major appliances and furniture, which require installation or a delivery person to fetch it inside your home—items that need to be delivered are usually too big to be shipped. Delivery is also the term used to refer to the date on which the package will arrive at the customer’s doorstep. However, this date is usually a general estimate since it’s uncontrollable by the vendor and can be delayed by unforeseen circumstances.

Shipping vs. Delivery: What’s the Difference?

Overall, there are two main differences between shipping and delivery. The first being the size: smaller items are shipped while larger items are delivered. The second difference is the date on which each takes place. Shipping dates usually refer to when an item leaves the warehouse while the delivery date specifies when it should reach the customer.

If you’re looking for a fulfillment company that’ll make your delivery date almost the same as the shipping date, then choose APS Fulfillment Inc. We serve a variety of industries, so whether you’re looking to ship retail, healthcare or financial items, or commercial furniture, we’ve got the solution for you. One of the main benefits of allowing APS to handle your fulfillment needs is the flexibility it allows your business. You’ll be able to not only save money and time by eliminating the need to set up your own fulfillment system, but you’ll also be able to scale your fulfillment services depending on the growth of your business. Fast and dependable fulfillment services is integral to maintaining a good rapport with customers, which is why you should trust APS—we take the extra care to ensure your customers receive their packages on time, and in good condition. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help your small business continue to grow.

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